Spring on Our Homestead

      18 Comments on Spring on Our Homestead
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Mixture of wild and garden greens for our dinner salad.

Mixture of wild and garden greens for our dinner salad.

Life is Good

Spring is probably my favorite season on the homestead. The world is beginning to green up. My garden is full of ‘weed free’ potential. Wild edibles are springing to life. The chickens, turkeys, and ducks are spending their days outside, searching for bugs and munching on grass. The egg yolks turn from lemon yellow to deep gold. Flowers and buds unfurl, welcoming the warmer days and sunshine. Life is good!

Life is Busy

With all of the activity on our homestead in spring, I sometimes feel a little overwhelmed. The garden needs quite a bit of work. I tilled most of it over the weekend and planted 4 varieties of potato – Yukon Gold, Red LaSoda, Idaho Russet, and Superior. I planted red, yellow, and white storage onion sets. I don’t think I’ll get any onion seeds in this year, but that’s ok. Shelling peas are in the ground as well as two varieties of beets and carrots, parsnips, and salsify. I have lettuce, spinach, and kale planted and some has sprouted.

Building a salad :)

Building a salad 🙂

The seedlings in my basement are doing great. The broccoli and Brussels sprouts can go outside on nice days now that it has warmed up. The peppers are taking a long time to germinate…as usual. But it always concerns me. What if I don’t have enough peppers? Egads, that would be tragic!

The incubator is humming away in the basement with turkey eggs due to hatch this weekend. I candled them and found at least one embryo alive and moving. I suspected that this hatch would not be 100% because so many of the eggs were chilled before I could collect them. I wasn’t surprised to find that at least 5 of the eggs have no embryos developing. So another 13 turkey eggs went into my second incubator along with some chicken eggs from a friend’s flock, just for new genetics and not at all because I need more chickens. 😉

My garden catalog order arrived while the ground was frozen solid. Two fruit trees, twenty-five strawberries,  and a raspberry were ‘heeled in’ a box of damp potting soil in the garage until the weather warmed the soil enough to plant them. There was a Carmine Jewel bush cherry that was already fully leafed out and I’m keeping it in the house until I’m sure that the nights aren’t too cold for it. Hopefully I can plant this little beauty outside soon.

My friend Jeanine is visiting from Montana for a few weeks, which is super awesome. Her husband is arriving next week to see their brand new grand baby. She’s super cute and I might even get to hold her soon!

Life is good…and very busy! What is happening on your homestead this spring?


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18 comments on “Spring on Our Homestead

  1. Jennell Townsend

    Hi
    I am interested in hearing more about this Carmine bush cherry. Is it a true cherry? What zones is it hardy to? I live in Michigan?

    Jennell

    Reply
    1. Lisa Lynn Post author

      Hi Jennell,
      I ordered it from Gurneys. They are hardy to zone 2 from what I read. I would think you could easily grow them. They are a real cherry from what I read.

      Reply
  2. Pingback: Spring on Our Homestead – Demos

    1. Lisa Lynn Post author

      What a wonderful way to make the best of what you have! And you can do so much on a micro farm 🙂 We sort of have a mini farm here. 1 acre is hard to consider a real farm 😉

      Reply
  3. Linda Steiger

    Admit it Lisa – you’re an incubator junkie just like the rest of us, haha. I actually let two of my consistent broody hens set on 8 eggs each (and I DON’T need any more chickens) but oh they wanted to be mamas and I almost bought some turkey eggs the other day just to see if I could hatch them in my incubator – We need an intervention!!! LOL

    Reply
    1. Lisa Lynn Post author

      Lol 🙂 I don’t have any hens that are reliably broody, so I have to use the incubator. But with the temperature fluctuations, I’m having trouble getting the temps to remain stable in the incubators. 🙁 So we’ll see what happens, I might not have any babies left alive and I’ll have to start over again.

      I think I will look into the thermostat control kit from Incubator Warehouse to see if I can get better results…Intervention…no way!

      Reply
  4. Vickie

    Wow – you are one busy woman! Here’s a funny story – I planted some pepper seeds and didn’t know that it sometimes took three weeks for certain varieties to germinate. So, after I didn’t see anything germinate after a couple of weeks, I threw the potting mix, seeds and all, into the compost. Lo and behold – a few weeks later I realized I had pepper plants in the compost pile! 🙂 Lesson learned!

    Reply
  5. latebloomershow

    Sounds like you’ve got your hands full! Enjoy the spring and your new chicks. Here, a helper and I dug up the front yard looking for an irrigation problem. I’m determined not to plant for summer till it was resolved, and fixed it yesterday. All the tubing still needs to be installed, but I won’t get to that till next weekend. Off to a late start, but, the season is long here, so I’m trying not to worry, haha. – Kaye

    Reply
    1. Lisa Lynn Post author

      Hi Kaye,
      I’m glad you found the irrigation issue and got it fixed! Now you can really go to town 🙂 If you can plant some short season varieties, it might help get them off to a quick start. Best wishes!

      Reply
  6. Pingback: Spring on Our Homestead | Around The Cabin

  7. Lorraine

    Peppers are notorious for a loooong germination time. This year I took all my seeds that I was starting indoors and I covered them with plastic (either plastic wrap taped over the starter flat or I slipped the whole thing into a plastic bag) I keep them warm and mist from time to time. It cut down on the germination time astoundingly! I have a heating pad and if it was available, I set the seed-starting flat on that. I have had much more success this way. Also, I did pre-germination tests on several packages of seeds that were a little elderly. I put a wet paper towel into a zip loc bag, set the seeds on the wet paper towel and close the zip loc part way. Amazing!! I was rewarded with a lot of seeds I might have thrown away. I just allow them to sprout and then I planted them. Voila! Instant plants.

    Isn’t Spring just the best?! God’s Creation in all its glory!

    Enjoy!

    Reply
    1. Lisa Lynn Post author

      I probably should have tested my germination rates too. I have some that still haven’t germinated and I’m starting to think they are a lost cause. Oh well, I’ll still have several varieties that are doing well.

      Thanks for the suggestions 🙂

      Reply
  8. Philenese

    Sounds like it is a lovely day on your homestead. I, too, think springtime is my favorite season … but then summer arrives with wonderful things to eat and our youngest is able to come home for two weeks and summer is my favorite season … but then summer is followed by autumn with harvest and the riot of colorful leaves to rake and it is my favorite and shortly after winter arrives Christmas with the grandkids and seed catalogs however I do despise ice.
    Thanks for you posts, they always make me smile.

    P.S. Have several baby chicks arriving next week. They are the survivors from the incubator experiment at school. The results were surprising (homemade incubator hatched 90% and zero in the borrowed LG incubator). It was the last nudge I needed to buy a Hova Bator of mine own. 🙂

    Reply
    1. Lisa Lynn Post author

      Lol…that’s why I said I think spring is my favorite season 🙂 I do the same thing! I’m just glad to have each and every season on my homestead. Best wishes with the baby chicks! and the incubator when you get one!

      Reply

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