‘One Too Many’ Pumpkins

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s pumpkinsCheck out my post on Heirloom Pumpkins!

‘One Too Many’ Pumpkins

I can never have too many pumpkins in my garden. I love all of the different varieties, colors and shapes of pumpkins one can find in the garden catalogs each spring. Of course, I want to try every kind and never seem to have enough room in my garden. But it doesn’t stop me from ordering new varieties of pumpkin seeds every year. This year I finally broke down, gave in to temptation, and ordered the ‘One Too Many’ hybrid pumpkin available from a popular seed company. I usually try not to order hybrids, but the coloration of the pumpkins shown in the catalog descriptions has been calling to me for several years.

I love the coloration of this pumpkin!

I love the coloration of this pumpkin!

 

The catalog description claims the pumpkin looks like a bloodshot eye, hence the name ‘One Too Many.’ I’m not sure that’s the name I would have picked, but I really liked the way these pumpkins looked growing in my garden this summer and sitting on my steps for the fall holidays. They will continue to decorate our entrance until after Thanksgiving, when I’ll probably feed them to the chickens and ducks.

The vines grew quite well this summer despite the dry weather, vine borers, and lack of weeding. I never fertilized them or fussed over them. The one vine bore two nice sized pumpkins that survived quite well.

They even look cool growing in the weeds!

They even look cool growing in the weeds!

 

I think that if I were to sell at a roadside stand, farmers’ market, or open a pumpkin patch, I would most likely grow these pretty pumpkins every year. But now that I’ve had my fun, I think I’ll go back to the heirloom varieties I usually buy. πŸ™‚

Everyone deserves to have a little fun in their garden! What is your favorite pumpkin variety? Do you grow pumpkins to sell? What is your best selling pumpkin?


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9 comments on “‘One Too Many’ Pumpkins

  1. Mary Bechard

    I planted Amish pie pumpkins for the first time last year, and despite very wet conditions and several plants rotting at the stem, I got two 10 pound pumpkins. I really liked their flavor and texture, but they didn’t seem to be very good keepers. I will be planting them again this year, though, and hope to get enough pumpkin in the freezer to last all winter. The variety that you grew is so pretty!

    Reply
  2. Michael

    hi Lisa, I’ve planted some Golden Molong pumpkins this year, just because. I have been away from my garden for 2 weeks, so I’m eager to see what’s happened.
    I’ll let you know how things go.

    Reply
    1. Lisa Lynn Post author

      Hi Michael,
      Thanks for stopping by to visit! I had to do a little research to find out more about the Golden Molong Pumpkins you mentioned…I had never heard of them before. I’m interested in hearing more about these pumpkins, as the story behind them is very intriguing!

      From what I have read, there is a very nice gentleman named Robert Ellis who lives in Molong, Australia…and he loves to grow giant, and tiny, pumpkins. He has sponsored a number of competitions to grow the largest and smallest pumpkins and has donated the proceeds from these events to different charities. How cool is that! But the story doesn’t stop there…he had come up with his own breed of pumpkin named after his hometown…the Golden Molong. This is where my information dried up and I can’t find out much about the variety you are growing.

      If you have any more information, I’d love to read about it!

      Thanks so much for sharing, and giving me some insight into the pumpkins bred by Mr. Ellis!
      Enjoy your garden and getting back to work in your soil!

      PS: For anyone interested, here is one of the links that I found about this variety of pumpkin…
      http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2010/02/11/2816925.htm

      Reply
  3. Lisa Lynn Post author

    You’ll love growing pumpkins, Linda! I didn’t do any fall decorating this year other than putting my pumpkins and gourds on the steps and deck. That’s too funny that you got all those pumpkins…I wouldn’t be surprised if they are my cousins. πŸ™‚ My chickens don’t care that much for pumpkins either. But the ducks like them. It’s a riot watching ducks try to eat a pumpkin!
    Hope you have a great bunch of pumpkins next year!

    Reply
  4. Linda Steiger

    Hi Lisa,
    Have never grown pumpkins – just acorn & butternut squash – but we are going to have to get some of that seed next year – what a gorgeous color! I actually bought two small plastic ones to decorate my front porch this year, but can see a couple of these beauties as decorators next year! Two years ago hubby bought a van full of pumpkins (and I mean full!) from two young boys who had a veggie stand out in South Dayton and were throwing them out at the end of the season. He gave them a good donation for all they had and they happily helped him load our mini van from floor to ceiling. We dropped them from our deck onto big flat rocks in the hen yard to open them up and they were all just “so so” about them. I thought they would go nuts for the seeds (oh well). My sheep years ago were more excited about a load we gave them than the hens were. And after putting at least a hundred pumpkins around the yard in various places, you’d think at least one would have sprouted into a vine this year! Nope not a one.

    Reply
  5. Tammy/Our Neck of the Woods

    That is such a pretty pumpkin! I love the colors. We grew pumpkins for the first time this year and I am hooked. Our porch was decorated with so many pumpkins! Still is, actually πŸ™‚ I don’t know what variety they are because we just saved seeds from a pumpkin that was given to us last year. But it was so fun to grow them!

    Reply
    1. Lisa Lynn Post author

      Hi Tammy,
      Thanks πŸ™‚ It’s fun to have a bunch of pumpkins around, so I can see why you’re hooked! I let a bunch of gourd and pumpkin seeds from the compost sprout and grow too.

      Reply
  6. janet pesaturo

    Hi Lisa, I don’t have a favorite, I love them all. So many varieties of pumpkins and winter squash, all achingly symbolic of the all too fleeting harvest season. Too hard to choose. I usually grow several varieities

    Reply

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