Spring Garden Chores Checklist

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Mary's Heirloom Seeds
Spring Garden Chores Checklist - www.TheSelfSufficientHomeAcre.com

Spring Garden Chores and Checklist

Having a spring garden chores checklist is helpful for staying on track this time of year. I know my spring chores are on my mind! My garden clean-up is started, but far from complete. In the video below, I share with you just how messy my garden was this past week. (Fortunately, I did get a chance to do some more cleanup and I’ll share that soon.)

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Spring Garden Chores and Checklist
Onion sets, ready to plant.

Working on My Spring Garden Cleanup!

There are 4 garden beds prepared, 3 of them planted with onion sets, bunching onions, lettuce, kale, arugula, collards, kale, spinach, tatsoi greens, corn salad (mache), and turnips. The weather has been rainy and cold since I planted them, so there isn’t much action yet.

Besides planting in the garden, I have flats of seedlings under lights in the basement. Here’s what I have germinating:

  • Hot peppers
  • Sweet bell peppers
  • Tomatoes
  • Eggplant
  • Sage
  • Rosemary
  • Broccoli
  • Cabbage
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Lettuce
  • Collards
  • Kale

I’m looking forward to planting the seedlings outdoors!

But first, I have a ton of work to do to get my garden ready. If you are in the northern states, you’re probably in a similar situation. I’ve compiled a checklist of spring garden chores to help you plan and get your gardening chores underway…

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
Packets of seeds waiting to be planted!

Spring Garden Chores and Checklist

  • Start seedlings under lights
  • Clean and oil tools
  • Remove debris and rake garden
  • Burn or compost debris
  • Turn soil and prepare for planting when the soil is dry enough
  • Build raised beds
  • Start hugelkulture beds
  • Set up cold frames
  • Plant cool season crops
  • Clean pots for flowers and container crops
  • Prepare beds for warm season crops
  • Harden off seedlings
  • Transplant seedlings
  • Mulch paths, around plants, landscaping beds
  • Prune dead or rubbing branches on trees and shrubs
  • Divide perennials
  • Transplant strawberries, brambles, perennial vegetables
  • Plant fruit trees, small fruits, and berries
  • Purchase tools, seeds, bulbs, tubers, and plants
  • Harvest early season crops
Walking onions are the first greens in my garden each spring.

Harvesting Some Egyptian Walking Onions and French Sorrel

I’m excited to have green onions from my garden and French sorrel to add to our salads and omelets. Soon there will be rhubarb, asparagus, and some wild greens to forage. I’ve shared some information on these crops in case you’d like to grow or forage for your own early season veggies.

Our First Green Onions of the Season

Perennial Vegetables for Self Sufficiency

I’ve also compiled a list of other helpful gardening articles:

Eco Friendly Seed Starting

How to Start Seedlings Indoors

Gardening in Cool Weather – Starting Your Spring Crops

How to Make a Survival Seed Bank – Not just for prepping! Read up on the best way to save those seeds you don’t use in your garden this year. 🙂

Guide to Using Hay or Straw in Your Garden

How to Start a Community Garden

Let me know if there are other topics you’re interested in reading about…I’m always interested in hearing your thoughts!

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Spring Garden Chores Checklist - www.TheSelfSufficientHomeAcre.com

Shared on, Farm Fresh Tuesdays, the Simple Homestead Hop & Off Grid Hop

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Lisa Lombardo

Freelance Writer at Tohoca, LLC
Lisa writes in-depth articles about gardening and homesteading topics. She grew up on a farm and has continued learning about horticulture, animal husbandry, and home food preservation ever since. She has earned an Associate of Applied Science in Horticulture and a Bachelor of Fine Arts. She is a self proclaimed gardening freak and crazy chicken lady.

In addition to writing for her own websites, Lisa has contributed articles to The Prepper Project and Homestead.org.

The author lives outside of Chicago with her husband, son, 2 dogs, 1 cat, and a variety of poultry.
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About Lisa Lombardo

Lisa writes in-depth articles about gardening and homesteading topics. She grew up on a farm and has continued learning about horticulture, animal husbandry, and home food preservation ever since. She has earned an Associate of Applied Science in Horticulture and a Bachelor of Fine Arts. She is a self proclaimed gardening freak and crazy chicken lady. In addition to writing for her own websites, Lisa has contributed articles to The Prepper Project and Homestead.org. The author lives outside of Chicago with her husband, son, 2 dogs, 1 cat, and a variety of poultry.

2 comments on “Spring Garden Chores Checklist

  1. Maria Zannini

    I bought some corn salad seeds this year, but I’ve never tried tatsoi. What would you say they taste like? Are they bitter greens?
    There’s always so much to do this time of year. The trick is to get out there in between the rains.

    Reply
    1. Lisa Lombardo Post author

      Hi Maria,
      The tatsoi are a lot like pak choi…more cabbage flavored and not bitter.

      It’s snowing here today…sigh.

      Reply

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