Using Our Farm Fresh Eggs

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Using Our Farm Fresh Eggs!

Farm Fresh Eggs from Our Hens

Using our farm fresh eggs for breakfast and baking is such a treat! I went for several months without any home-raised before I had hip replacement surgery. That experience really made me appreciate our new hens and all the fresh eggs they give us. πŸ™‚

Keeping laying hens for fresh eggs is one of the first projects many homesteaders try out and for good reason. Pasture-raised eggs are more nutritious for us, according to researchers. The yolks are a deep shade of gold and they taste so much better than store bought!

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Some folks choose to let their hens take the winter off from laying, while others keep their flock in production. I choose to keep the eggs coming through the winter, although this is a personal choice.

laying hens and farm fresh eggs are a part of my homestead

Farm Fresh Eggs is One of My Favorite Topics

Laying Hens and farm fresh eggs are two of my favorite topics to write about! Over the years I’ve shared a lot of information about the subject of keeping hens for your own fresh eggs. Here are some of my favorite posts about keeping laying hens and using their eggs!

How to Sell Your Farm Fresh Eggs - The Self Sufficient HomeAcre

How to Sell Your Farm Fresh Eggs

12 Ways to Reduce Your Chicken Feed Bill

How to Feed Your Hens for Best Egg Production

how to get more eggs from your laying hens

How to Get More Eggs from Your Laying Hens

What to Do With Extra Eggs

How to Tell if a Hen is Laying Eggs

Color Your Easter Eggs without a kit

Color Your Easter Eggs Without a Kit

The Chicken Chronicles – Easter Eggers

Last week I announced that I’ve started a new website and shared my concerns about ordering chicks this spring. I wasn’t sure we would be home enough to take care of them. This week I feel like throwing caution to the wind and placing an order for chicks, even if it ends up being a pain to travel and find a chicken sitter. I’m a little crazy like that. πŸ™‚

16 Cold Tolerant Chicken Breeds - The New Homesteader's Almanac
Do you live in a cold climate? This article is for you!

So I’ve been researching the best breeds to keep in my cold climate. Right now I have all White Leghorns and these hens are egg laying machines. I love that! But the extreme cold weather this winter has me thinking about chicken breeds that are more adapted to my climate.

I shared a post over on The New Homesteader’s Almanac on the 16 Best Cold Tolerant Chicken Breeds…just in case you are looking for chickens that can handle the cold too. I hope you’ll stop by and check out my new site and maybe even sign up for updates!

Do you have laying hens? What is your favorite breed?

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Using Our Farm Fresh Eggs!

Shared on Off Grid Hop

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Lisa Lombardo

Freelance Writer at Tohoca, LLC
Lisa writes in-depth articles about gardening and homesteading topics. She grew up on a farm and has continued learning about horticulture, animal husbandry, and home food preservation ever since. She has earned an Associate of Applied Science in Horticulture and a Bachelor of Fine Arts. She is a self proclaimed gardening freak and crazy chicken lady.

In addition to writing for her own websites, Lisa has contributed articles to The Prepper Project and Homestead.org.

The author lives outside of Chicago with her husband, son, 2 dogs, 1 cat, and a variety of poultry.
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About Lisa Lombardo

Lisa writes in-depth articles about gardening and homesteading topics. She grew up on a farm and has continued learning about horticulture, animal husbandry, and home food preservation ever since. She has earned an Associate of Applied Science in Horticulture and a Bachelor of Fine Arts. She is a self proclaimed gardening freak and crazy chicken lady. In addition to writing for her own websites, Lisa has contributed articles to The Prepper Project and Homestead.org. The author lives outside of Chicago with her husband, son, 2 dogs, 1 cat, and a variety of poultry.

10 comments on “Using Our Farm Fresh Eggs

  1. WT Abernathy

    We’ve a mix of breeds on the homestead, from black sex-linked to NH reds to polish. The eggs keep coming, and we keep using them or sending them out to neighbors. I think tomorrow, the kids will be bringing a few dozen to school for their teachers:)
    Cheers for the share on the Hop:)

    Reply
    1. Lisa Lombardo Post author

      What a great gift for their teachers! I have fun visiting your blog hop every week…thanks for the opportunity to share!

      Reply
  2. Tamara Reid

    We raise and breed Blue Laced Red Wyandottes, BBS (blue, black and splash) Marans, BBS Ameraucanas and mixed breed Olive Eggers. My girls were in 4-H showing poultry for 14 years and my husband was the project leader for about half of those years. Now that the girls are grown, the breeds we have left, are my chosen breeds to work with, chosen for their colorful eggs, disposition and unique looks. In the past, the girls have worked with mostly bantam breeds, including Salmon Faverolles, Old English Game, and Cochins. We are just a tad chicken crazy around here! LOL!

    Reply
    1. Lisa Lombardo Post author

      Hi Tamara,
      It’s easy to go overboard, isn’t it? Lol! Sounds like you’ve gotten things simplified a bit and you have some wonderful breeds on your homestead! Thanks for sharing. πŸ™‚

      Reply
  3. Annie Lewellyn

    Having chickens is so addicting when you are homesteading! I am so glad, though, that you have decided to do some research to make sure the chickens you choose will be adaptable to your climate! Good luck with your ordering! I have over 40 mixed birds and I love every one of them!

    Reply
    1. Lisa Lombardo Post author

      Hi Annie,
      Yes, it is addicting. It seems kind of weird to only have 5 right now. πŸ™‚ Yes, I want to order some that won’t be so susceptible to frostbite. The rooster has the worst time of it. Thanks for stopping by!

      Reply
  4. nancy

    We had the challenge of both cold winters and very hot summers. We’ve had great luck with Rhode Island Reds, New Hampshire Reds, Barred Rocks, and now Plymouth Rock with our small flock of hens. We didn’t have as much luck with the sex links cross breeds. I think over time the older breeds work great here!

    Reply
    1. Lisa Lombardo Post author

      Hi Nancy,
      Those are all breeds that do well with both hot and cold climates and I’m considering each of those breeds. Right now I am busy with a family visit. But next week I need to decide! Thanks for sharing your thoughts!

      Reply
  5. Maria Zannini

    I didn’t realize you live outside Chicago. Hubby and I grew up in Chicago, but we got to Texas as soon as we could. πŸ™‚

    I’ve tried several breeds. My favorites are Australorp for their temperament and Americauna for the pretty eggs. I try to raise dual purpose birds since I incubate my own eggs. Roosters go to the freezer and I update my layers every couple of years.

    Reply
    1. Lisa Lombardo Post author

      Hi Maria,
      That’s funny! Tom and I both grew up in Western NY but moved here when he got a job in the area. I think a lot of people just want to move somewhere new when they are young and adventurous. πŸ™‚

      I like Australorps and Americaunas too…they are 2 of the breeds I am considering for new layers. I also put the extra roosters and my old layers in the freezer or I pressure can them for soup.

      Thanks for stopping by, Maria! It’s good to hear from you!

      Reply

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